Are Whistleblowers Being Protected By The NRC? Not Really!

 

About This Podcast

Fairewinds Chief Engineer Arnie Gundersen and special guest David Lochbaum, the Director of Nuclear Safety for the Union of Concerned Scientists, compare experiences about how nuclear whistleblowers are NOT protected by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission if they bring safety concerns forward. They will also discuss examples citing instances of the NRC failing to support the legitimate concerns of whistleblowers in the nuclear industry, including inside the NRC itself.

Listen

Transcript

English

KH: This is the Energy Education podcast for Sunday, February 17, 2013. I'm Kevin. Today's discussion is all about nuclear whistleblowers and the process they are sometimes forced to use when they call attention to problems within the industry. We will talk about the alternative dispute resolution process. This is a process for nuclear industry workers who have been unfairly targeted or discriminated against to resolve their disputes. Frequently, nuclear whistleblowers find themselves in exactly that situation. Today we will be joined by David Lochbaum from the Union of Concerned Scientists to discuss the alternative dispute resolution process and hear some of his stories.

KH: All right, today on the show I would like to welcome David Lochbaum. David Lochbaum is with the Union of Concerned Scientists. He is the Director of Safety Projects. David, welcome to the show.

DL: Hello, Kevin.

KH: And of course, Arnie Gundersen, as always. Welcome to the show.

AG: Hi Kevin, hi Dave.

DL: Hello Arnie.

KH: Dave, I would like to start with you. Today we are talking about whistleblowers and the ADR process. Can you tell our listeners, what exactly is the ADR process?

DL: The alternate dispute resolution or ADR process was instituted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission about 5 or 6 years ago. It is a process where whistleblowers who have raised safety issues and have been retaliated or harassed by their management for doing so, can seek to get their situation remedied. If they have been laid off, if they have been denied a promotion, if they have been otherwise harmed for raising a safety issue, the whistleblowers and their companies can enter into an ADR process that is moderated by people out of Cornell University to try to reach some settlement, some arrangement where the problems of the past have been fixed.

KH: So David, how does that process work in reality?

DL: Well in reality, the problem that the whistleblower fell into, whether it was loss of a job or losing overtime or some other harm for having raised a safety issue, at most it is getting fixed. What happens when the NRC allows an ADR process to get started is that the NRC walks away. They do not investigate the underlying technical issues. If a settlement is reached, the company gets to do so scott free. So the company could basically get rid of a hundred whistleblowers a year and it does not show up anywhere on the NRC's books as being a problem, even though there are federal laws being violated. And also the NRC does not go in and look at the technical issues to see if they have been fixed or not.

KH: So David, if a whistleblower or a nuclear worker goes to the NRC and then they are referred to the ADR process, how does that show up in the records?

DL: It really does not show up at all. It ends up being underneath the NRC's radar. Prior to the ADR process, if the NRC substantiated that whistleblowers had been retaliated against, which violates federal laws, if the company had a pattern of that, more than one occurring, then the NRC would step in and issue a chilling effects letter that said, you have got a pattern of breaking federal laws here, what are you going to do to fix it and the perception amongst the workforce that they cannot raise safety issues. Under ADR, all that is hidden from both the workforce, the public and the NRC. The companies can basically do away with whistleblowers as a business decision, getting rid of them and the technical issues they raise.

KH: So if a whistleblower does not feel that the ADR process is satisfactory, does it go back to the NRC?

DL: That is correct. It stays under the old process where the NRC will send out the Office of Investigations to look into the charges that the company violated federal laws. If the Office of Investigations substantiates those claims, the NRC then can consider taking enforcement action against the company and also referring the case to the Department of Justice for possible criminal sanctions. As an example of the ADR process, in 2007, a worker at the Calloway Nuclear Plant in Missouri raised an issue and was . . . irritated his employer and his employer took action against him for having raised that safety issue. The employee went to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission because he felt that his employer had violated federal laws by retaliating against him. The ADR process was invoked, the company, and this whistleblower reached an agreement, no action was taken against the company, the worker no longer works at the Calloway nuclear power plant, the underlying issue was never investigated by the NRC to see if the problems that the worker raised were ever fixed or not.

KH: So this worker raised concerns over a technical issue, but what you are saying is since he reached a settlement in the ADR process, that that underlying technical issue was dropped and never actually investigated?

DL: It would be like if somebody committed murder, if the murderer reached an agreement with the victims's family, bought them off, then they would drop the charges and the state or the feds would never look into it. That is not the way to think. You cannot kill somebody and get away with it, unless you are O.J. Basically the companies can make a decision: is it cheaper for me to fix the safety problem or pay off the whistleblower and send him out the door. And that is not the way safety should be handled in America's nuclear power plants.

KH: So of course the problem was never really addressed.

DL: No. It is papered over, swept under the rug, and that rug is getting awfully lumpy by now. On average, the NRC handles about 5 to 10 of these cases a year. So that is 5 or 10 nuclear safety problems not getting fixed each and every year.

AG: The other piece of this is that if somebody is fired, they have no income. So even if there is a legitimate safety concern and it sure would be nice if the NRC knew about it, they really have no choice but to settle because their income has completely dried up.

DL: That is absolutely correct. I mean the deck . . . it all favors the companies. They hold the money. They have the benefit of time. And the NRC is aiding and abetting, they are breaking the laws. It is a dire situation. It is only getting worse. For an agency that claims to be as transparent as it is, it is amazing how much they hide behind the curtain.

KH: So what if we are talking about a worker who raises a safety concern?

DL: But if you have just a safety concern with no harassment or intimidation involved, then that goes into the NRC's allegation process where they seek to go out and answer that question within a 180 days. That is a somewhat tenuous schedule; we have had some that are almost 2 years old now, so apparently it is not 180 days in a row. Last year, 2 NRC staffers, Richard Perkins and Larry Criscione, raised concerns about how the NRC was dealing with flooding issues at the county plant in South Carolina and 32 other nuclear power plants in the United States. Perkins had authored a study of what the flooding hazard was and the NRC had improperly withheld that from the public, was Perkins' claim. Perkins has gone to the NRC's Inspector General, which is investigating when the NRC withheld that information or not. Criscione also reviewed that report, was involved with that report, raised some concerns. He sent letters directly to Chairman McFarland and Senators Lieberman, before he left office, and Boxer. The NRC responded by investigating Larry Criscione for leaking information outside the agency, rather than investigating whether it should have been withheld or not. Basically, it is the attack the messenger, kill the messenger syndrome.

KH: Now has Criscione filed within the agency for some sort of protection?

DL: Larry Criscione yet has not suffered any retaliation or discrimination, so he has not yet filed any action to prevent it. They are investigating him, "they" being the NRC's Inspector General, appears concerned that once the Inspector General finishes that investigation, that will be the grounds for terminating or dis-appointing him. Larry has received a letter in his file warning him against distributing information outside the agency, even though we provided Larry and his attorney with countless cases where other NRC employees did the same or worse without any sanction whatsoever. So he is being targeted unnecessarily and it is the NRC at it's absolute worst. Larry Criscione should be in the White House receiving some award from the President, not worrying about his job.

KH: Now did these 2 whistleblowers also go through the ADR process?

DL: The NRC does not have an ADR process for people who raise safety issues like this. In fact, when Larry Criscione sent the letter to Chairman McFarland, they were a little bit perplexed about how to handle it because the NRC does not have a written process for how to deal with that, how to handle __ with an issue that somebody has raised to the Chairman. You would think in some 30 years that it might have come up once before, but apparently not. So they are still trying to figure out how to handle or respond to Larry's letter dated September 19th, 2012. They have not yet responded to his concerns. If you look more broadly at the NRC, every 3 years, the Inspector General surveys the NRC workforce for safety culture and climate issues. Last October, the latest survey was presented. The Commission reviewed those results behind closed doors, which is safety culture 101: if you cannot talk about it in public, you do not have a good safety culture. The results, when we obtained them, showed that there is a big gap between how senior managers at the NRC view issues and the workforce (view) issues. In fact, the consultant that does this survey said that the gap at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is wider than they have ever seen in federal agencies or in the private sector. We take that to mean that if the NRC's senior managers do not see problems, they cannot fix problems they do not see. They have, not rose colored glasses, they have green colored glasses; everything looks great to them. So they do not fix problems in the house, they do not fix problems at a county, they do not fix fire protection problems at Brown's Ferry, they just collect their paychecks and retirement.

AG: You know, in Maggie and my situation, that was back in 1990 before there was alternative dispute resolution, I found some safety problems and I did not go to the NRC, I went to the president of the company and you know it's a senior VP and I thought he would listen to me about these violations and instead he fired me. I then went to the NRC and I really believed the NRC would come riding in like the calvary and rescue me. And instead, the NRC started shooting at me too. They botched the audit and they did not see any of the problems that I brought forward. So finally I went to Congress and wrote to John Glenn and the Government Oversight Committee, and there were congressional hearings that John Glenn fired up because he had the Inspector General involved. And the Inspector General found that all the safety concerns that I had identified and then a couple more actually did exist and that the NRC deliberately botched the inspection, basically because they did not want to chase all the paperwork required if they had found anything. And he also found that the NRC was taking bribes from my employer. So that all came out in congressional testimony. After that, I wrote to the NRC again, through my attorney, and I said, you know Mr. Gundersen is being sued here for a million and a half dollars and we actually had the transcriptions from the president of the company and he said he is suing me because I wrote to Congress. Well the reason I wrote to Congress is because the NRC was corrupt and blew the inspection. And the NRC did not lift a finger. Their comment was, well that is a civil matter and if he is being sued, we cannot do anything about it. But if you win your lawsuit we will think about doing something. And of course 6 or 7 years later with no income, that became a moot point. So you know the old system did not work and now it seems as if the new system does not work either.

KH: Arnie, when you say 6 or 7 years later it became a moot point, what do you mean?

AG: Well, I blew the whistle in 1990 and we finally reached, a court settlement __ would be with my employer at the end of 1996. Meanwhile, we were driven into bankruptcy, we lost our house in foreclosure, lost our retirement, obviously I was not going to get hired back in the nuclear industry again, so it was a devastating process and frankly the out of court process, the out of court settlement did not compensate us for what we had lost, let alone anything moving forward. But you know you have to get on with your life at some point. And it fundamentally altered the trajectory of my career and the trajectory of my life. That is why we are running Fairewinds right now and I think at the end of the day, running Fairewinds has been rewarding.

KH: Incredible. Well, Dave, have you had any experiences similar to this?

DL: It is not quite as drastic an outcome as what Arnie and Maggie went through. But when I was working in the nuclear industry, a colleague and I raised an issue, a similar path to Arnie's, raised it initially to the company who did not want to do anything about it, took it to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, like Arnie, we thought it was like calling in the calvary, but instead, Laurel and Hardy showed up. It was a joke. We ended up going to Congress just like Arnie did, to get that trickle down effect where the Congress put some pressure on the NRC to finally do something to resolve the issue and that led to my departure from the industry as well and moved to UCS (Union of Concerned Scientists). And what another colleague calls ethical cleansing, ethics and the industry do not mix very well. So the UCS job provided me a chance to still work on safety issues and not have to worry about a paycheck.

AG: I think a lot of people should be really grateful for the work you do at UCS, Dave, I will tell you that.

DL: I appreciate that Arnie, and the work that you do in Fairewinds and many others, Ray Shadis, and Jim Warren and many around the country has been a pleasant part of this job is to work with so many great colleagues around the country. I get an awful lot of calls from people, workers at plants and staffers at the NRC, who want me to be the public face on their concerns, so that the issue can be pursued without them jeopardizing their careers and I am glad to do that because too many people have been sacrificed on the nuclear alter and we do not need to do any more. So, if I can work on an issue and protect their careers, I am glad to do so.

AG: Dave, listening to you as always, gives me goosebumps.

DL: My hat's off to Fairewinds for the work you are doing. I mean if you would go to YouTube and put in almost any nuclear topic, Fairewinds comes out, you know, 4 or 5 of the top 10 slots on almost any issue and that is a testament to the work you guys are doing. I am glad to be part of it.

AG: Well thank you Dave.

KH: All right. Well, Dave, thanks for joining us today.

DL: Thanks, Kevin.

KH: And Arnie, as always.

AG: Thanks, Kevin.

KH: And that does it for this week's edition of the show. You can join us back here next week for more discussion on what is happening in the world of nuclear news. Also, don't forget to "Like" us on Facebook. For Fairewinds Energy Education, I'm Kevin. Thanks for listening

Deutsch

Whistleblower (im Deutschen keine Entsprechung verfügbar!): 

Wie Insider ständig gegen Vertuschungen ankämpfen,

angefeindet von den Behörden, die sie eigentlich in Schutz nehmen sollten

KH: Dies ist der Energy Education Podcast vom Sonntag, dem 17. Februar 2013. Ich bin Kevin. Heute dreht sich unser Gespräch um Aufdecker innerhalb der Atomindustrie – und auch innerhalb der Aufsichtsbehörden; insbesondere wird es um den speziellen Ablauf gehen, der ihnen mitunter auferlegt wird, wenn sie Fehlverhalten in der Atomindustrie publik machen. Wir werden über den sog alternative dispute resolution process sprechen (also einen alternativen Konfliktbeilegungsmechanismus; ADR Prozess). Mitarbeitern der Atomindustrie, die von ihren eigenen Arbeitgebern verfolgt oder diskriminiert werden, soll dieser Mechanismus helfen, die Differenzen beizulegen. Häufig finden sich Arbeitnehmer der Atomindustrie, die auf Missstände aufmerksam gemacht haben, in genau dieser Lage wieder. Heute nimmt David Lochbaum von der Union of Concerned Scientists (Vereinigung besorgter Wissenschaftler) an unserem Gespräch über diesen Konfliktbeilegungsmechanismus teil; mit ihm werden wir einige der Fälle durchgehen. Hallo also David Lochbaum, der in Sicherheitsangelegenheiten für die Vereinigung besorgter Wissenschaftler arbeite. David, willkommen zu unserer Sendung!

DL: Hallo Kevin!

KH: Und freilich ist auch Arnie Gundersen wieder dabei. Arnie, herzlich willkommen!

AG: Hallo Kevin! Hallo David!

DL: Hallo Arnie!

KH: Dave, ich möchte mit Ihnen beginnen. Heute soll es also um Aufdecker gehen und um den ADR Prozess. Können Sie unseren Zuhörern einmal erklären, was unter einem ADR Prozess zu verstehen ist?

DL: Dieser Mechanismus wurde von der Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USamerikanische Atomaufsichtsbehörde NRC) vor ungefähr fünf oder sechs Jahren eingerichtet. Es ist ein Mechanismus für Mitarbeiter, die Missstände aufgezeigt haben und dafür von ihren Arbeitgebern angegriffen und schikaniert werden: der Prozess soll ihnen die Möglichkeit geben, dieser Situation abzuhelfen. Wurden sie zum Beispiel entlassen oder bei einer Beförderung übergangen oder wurde ihnen in irgendeiner anderen Weise Schaden zugefügt, nur weil sie ihrer Sorge über sicherheitsrelevante Vorgänge Ausdruck verliehen haben, so können diese Individuen und ihre Firmen in einen ADR Prozess eintreten, der von Angehörigen der Universität von Cornell durchgeführt wird, um die Streitigkeiten beizulegen, um eine Übereinkunft zu erzielen, in der die Ausgangsprobleme einer Lösung zugeführt werden können.

KH: Nun David, wie läuft so ein Mechanismus dann konkret ab?

DL: Im realen Leben schaut es so aus, dass das Problem, mit dem der Aufdecker konfrontiert ist - ob er nun seinen Job verloren hat oder Überstundenzahlungen nicht ausbezahlt wurden oder er irgendeinen anderen Nachteil zu verbuchen hat, nur weil er auf Sicherheitsmängel hingewiesen hat –bestenfalls korrigiert wird. Sobald dieser ADR Prozess durch die NRC einmal angestoßen wurde, zieht sie sich zurück. Die zu Grunde liegenden technischen Sachverhalte werden nicht untersucht; wenn es zu einer Einigung kommt, ist die Betreiberfirma damit aus dem Schneider. Die Atomindustrie kann sich auf diese Art und Weise von hunderten Aufdeckern trennen, in den Aufzeichnungen der NRC tauchen diese Zahlen nirgends auf – obwohl Bundesgesetze übertreten wurden. Vor allem aber interessiert sich die NRC nicht für die technischen Details und ob diese korrigiert wurden oder nicht.

KH: David, wenn nun also so ein Aufdecker zur NRC geht und dann auf den ADR Prozess verwiesen wird, wie wird darüber Buch geführt?

DL: Eigentlich gar nicht, es es kommt gar nicht über die Aufmerksamkeitsschwelle der NRC. Vor der Einrichtung des ADR Prozesses stellte die NRC fest, ob gegen Aufdecker Maßnahmen ergriffen wurden, was gegen Bundesgesetze verstößt. Wenn sich bei einer Firma ein Muster ergab, also mehr als nur ein Einzelfall, dann schritt die NRC ein und verfasste einen speziellen Brief. In diesem stand in etwa: „Bei euch wird reihenweise Bundesgesetz übertreten: Was werdet ihr tun, um diesen Zustand in Ordnung zu bringen, sodass eure Mitarbeiter nicht das Gefühl haben müssen, sie dürfen sicherheitsrelevante Missstände nicht ansprechen?“ Beim ADR Prozess wird all das verborgen, vor den anderen Arbeitnehmern, der Öffentlichkeit und auch der NRC. Die Firmen können also Aufdecker im Rahmen einer rein wirtschaftlichen Entscheidung loswerden, sie selbst und auch die [Thematisierung der] technischen Sachverhalte, die von ihnen aufgezeigt wurden.

KH: Wenn einer dieser Aufdecker nun den Eindruck hat, dass der ADR Prozess keine zufriedenstellende Lösung darstellt, geht der Fall dann wieder an die NRC zurück?

DL Das ist richtig. Dann greift wieder der alte Ablauf, bei dem die NRC Untersuchungen anstellt, ob die betroffene Firma Bundesgesetze übertreten hat; wenn die Untersuchungsabteilung herausfindet, dass diese Anschuldigungen zutreffen, kann die NRC beschließen, die Einhaltung der Gesetze bei der Firma einzuklagen und den Fall an das Justizministerium weiterzugeben, um ein weiterführendes strafrechtliches Vorgehen abzuklären. Ein Beispiel für den ADR Mechanismus: im Jahr 2007 hat ein Mitarbeiter des Atomkraftwerks von Callaway, Missouri einen Missstand aufgezeigt und dadurch seinen Arbeitgeber so erbost, dass dieser Arbeitgeber Schritte gegen den Mitarbeiter einleitete, dafür, dass eine Sicherheitslücke aufgedeckt worden war. Der Arbeitnehmer wandte sich an die NRC, weil er der Ansicht war, dass sein Arbeitgeber, indem er Repressalien ergriffen hatte, gegen Bundesgesetze verstieß. Es wurde der ADR Prozess eingeleitet, die Firma und dieser Aufdecker kamen zu einer Übereinkunft, es wurde nichts gegen die beteiligte Firma unternommen. Der Betreffende arbeitet nicht länger im AKW von Callaway, der zugrunde liegende Sachverhalt wurde nie untersucht, die NRC hat nie nachgesehen, ob die Probleme, die dieser Mitarbeiter aufgezeigt hatte, jemals angegangen wurden.

KH: Dieser Mitarbeiter hat also seiner Besorgnis wegen einer technischen Gegebenheit Ausdruck verliehen, aber nun erfahren wir, dass als Resultat des ADR Prozesses, in dem es zu einer Einigung gekommen ist, diese technischen Sachverhalte nicht weiter verfolgt oder untersucht wurden.

DL: Es ist so, wie wenn jemand einen Mord begehen würde und der Mörder mit der Familie des Opfers zu einer Einigung käme, zB indem er sie ausgezahlt hätte, wofür sie jede Anklage fallen ließen, und weder auf Landes- noch auf Bundesebene würde sich jemand weiter darum kümmern. Das ist nicht … Es darf nicht sein, dass man jemanden umbringt und dafür nicht zur Rechenschaft gezogen wird – es sei denn, du bist OJ [Simpson; AmÜ]. Im Grunde können diese Firmen eine einfache Entscheidung treffen: Ist es billiger für mich, dieses Sicherheitsproblem zu beheben, oder zahle ich den Aufdecker einfach aus und entlasse ihn? Das ist aber nicht die Art, wie mit Sicherheitsbelangen in amerikanischen AKWs verfahren werden sollte.

KH: Das eigentliche Problem wurde also nie angerührt.

DL: Nein. Es wird zugekleistert, unter den Teppich gekehrt – der Teppich wird in der Zwischenzeit aber schon ganz schön uneben. Die NRC bearbeitet etwa fünf bis zehn dieser Fälle pro Jahr. Das bedeutet, dass jedes Jahr zwischen fünf und zehn Sicherheitsprobleme nicht beseitigt werden.

AG: Die andere Seite von all dem ist: wenn jemand gefeuert wird, so hat diese Person kein Einkommen. Also selbst, wenn es Sicherheitsbedenken gibt und sich so jemand denkt, dass es schon ganz gut wäre, wenn die NRC etwas unternähme, so gibt es keine andere Wahl, als eine Einigung anzustreben, denn sein Einkommen ist versiegt. Sie haben keine Mittel.

DL: Absolut richtig. Die Firmen haben alle Karten in der Hand. Sie haben das Geld, sie haben Zeit – und die NRC hilft ihnen dabei und unternimmt nichts, wenn sie gegen das Gesetz verstoßen. Es ist eine verhängnisvolle Situation und wird immer schlimmer. Bei einer Behörde, die vorgibt, besonders transparent zu sein, ist es schon erstaunlich, wie viel sie zu verbergen trachtet.

KH: Wenn wir zum Beispiel von einem Mitarbeiter sprechen, der in einer Angelegenheit Bedenken wegen der Sicherheit hat...

DL: Wenn es also nur um ein gerechtfertigtes Sicherheitsbedenken geht, ohne dass irgendeine Verfolgung oder Einschüchterung im Spiel ist, dann mündet das in einen Prozess der NRC für Behauptungen – dann soll innerhalb von 180 Tagen der Fall aufgegriffen und abgeklärt werden. Aber dieser Fahrplan ist mehr als unsicher: Wir haben Fälle, die nun schon älter als zwei Jahre sind – anscheinend sind nicht 180 aufeinander folgende Tage gemeint. Letztes Jahr haben zwei Angehörige des NRC, Richard Perkins und Larry Criscione, ihre Besorgnis darüber zum Ausdruck gebracht, wie die NRC mit Fragen zur Gefahr von Überflutungen beim AKW von Oconee in South Carolina und 32 anderen amerikanischen Bundesstaaten umgeht. Perkins gab einen Bericht zur Überflutungsgefahr heraus und die NRC hielt das – gegen die Regeln – vor der Öffentlichkeit geheim, so jedenfalls die Behauptung von Perkins. Perkins ging nun zur Innenrevision der NRC, der dafür zuständig ist, um herauszufinden, ob die NRC Informationen ungerechtfertigt zurückhält oder nicht. Criscione war an diesem Bericht ebenfalls beteiligt. Er schrieb Briefe direkt an die Chefin der Behörde, Allison Macfarlane, und an die Senatoren Lieberman (solange er noch im Amt war) und Boxer. Die NRC reagierte, indem sie eine Untersuchung gegen Larry Criscione einleitete, weil er Informationen nicht innerhalb der NRC gehalten hatte, anstatt zu untersuchen, ob diese Information überhaupt zurückgehalten werden hätte sollen. Also. Kurz gesagt: Sie haben den Überbringer der Botschaft angegriffen. Der Überbringer schlechter Nachrichten wird geköpft.

KH: Hat nun Criscione innerhalb der Behörde um Absicherung angesucht?

DL: Larry Criscione wurde bislang noch nicht benachteiligt oder ähnliches, daher konnte er auch nicht darum ansuchen, dass dies verhindert wird. Er ist Ziel einer internen Untersuchung durch die Innenrevision und es gibt die Sorge, dass, wenn diese Untersuchung zu einem Ende kommt, Gründe gefunden sein werden, um ihn abzuschießen oder anderweitig zu enttäuschen. Larry hat einen Brief in seinem Dossier, der ihn davor warnt, Informationen an Personen außerhalb der NRC weiterzugeben, obwohl wir Larry und seinen Anwalt mit unzähligen Fällen versorgt haben, wo NRC-Angehörige das Gleiche oder Schlimmeres getan haben, ohne dafür irgendwie zur Rechenschaft gezogen zu werden. Er wird also grundlos zur Zielscheibe gemacht und das zeigt die NRC von ihrer absolut schlechtesten Seite. Larry Criscione sollte vom Präsidenten im Wei- ßen Haus irgendeine Auszeichnung bekommen, stattdessen muss er um seinen Job bangen.

KH: Sind diese zwei Aufdecker auch durch den ADR Prozess gegangen?

DL: Die NRC hat keinen ADR Prozess für Leute, die diese Art von Sicherheitsbedenken aufdecken. Als Larry Criscione diesen Brief an die Vorsitzende Macfarlane schickte, waren alle perplex, wie sie damit umgehen sollten, weil die NRC keinen festgelegten Ablauf hat, wie sie mit so einer Angelegenheit, die jemand an den Vorsitzenden heranträgt, umgehen soll. Man sollte meinen, dass so etwas im Laufe von 30 Jahren schon einmal passiert sein sollte, aber anscheinend ist das nicht der Fall. Die NRC ist also momentan damit beschäftigt herauszufinden, wie sie auf Larrys Brief vom 19. September 2012 reagieren sollen – bis jetzt sind sie noch gar nicht darauf eingegangen. Wenn man sich das Thema etwas breiter anschaut: Alle drei Jahre befragt die Innenrevision die Mitarbeiter zu Belangen der Sicherheitskultur und des allgemeinen Klimas [Fragen, welche die Sicherheit betreffen, ansprechen zu können]. Im vergangenen Oktober wurde die letzte Umfrage präsentiert. Die Behörde bespricht die Resultate dieser Umfrage hinter verschlossenen Türen. Das ist nun die Grundstufe jeder Sicherheitskultur: wenn du in der Öffentlichkeit nicht darüber sprechen kannst, dann hast du keine gute Sicherheitskultur. Die Resultate, als wir sie dann beschaffen konnten, zeigen eine große Kluft in der Einschätzung von Sicherheitsangelegenheiten zwischen der obersten Führung und den restlichen Mitarbeitern. Der Konsulent, der diese Umfrage durchführte, sagte sogar aus, diese Kluft beim NRCsei grö- ßer als alles, was er in anderen Behörden oder im Privatbereich jemals gesehen habe. Für uns heißt das, dass die Führungsebene der NRC Manager unfähig ist, Probleme zu erkennen, und natürlich können sie Probleme, die sie nicht sehen, auch nicht beheben. Sie tragen keine rosaroten, sondern grün gefärbte Brillen: für sie schaut es so aus, als ob alles ganz ausgezeichnet läuft. Also bringen sie im eigenen Haus keine Probleme in Ordnung, sie tun das auch nicht in Oconee, es werden die Feuerschutzprobleme von Brown’s Ferry nicht angegangen, sie sammeln nur ihre Gehaltszettel und warten auf ihre Pensionierung.

AG: Und weißt du, die Situation für Maggie und mich war 1990 so – das war allerdings vor Einführung des ADR Prozesses: Ich habe einige Sicherheitsrisiken entdeckt, aber ich bin nicht zur NRC gegangen, ich bin zum Direktor der Firma gegangen, [fragte ihn, was man tun könne, um diese Verstöße zu beheben [? Schwer verständlich]. Stattdessen wurde ich gefeuert. Dann erst ging ich zum NRC – ich habe wirklich geglaubt, dass die NRC mir zu Hilfe kommen und mich retten würde. Stattdessen fing nun auch die NRC an, auf mich loszugehen. Sie haben ihre Überprüfung verpfuscht und keinen der Umstände, die ich aufgezeigte habe, anerkannt. Schlussendlich bin ich dann zum Kongress gegangen. Ich habe John Glenn und dem Government Oversight Committee geschrieben (gemeint ist das United States Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, AmÜ). Es gab auch Anhörungen im Kongress; John Glenn wurde ziemlich aktiv und involvierte die Innenrevision. Diese bestätigte, dass alle von mir benannten Sicherheitsrisiken (und darüber hinaus noch ein paar weitere) tatsächlich existierten und dass die NRC bewusst die Inspektion verschlampt hatte, im Grunde, weil sie sich all den Papierkram nicht antun wollten, der ansonsten fällig gewesen wäre. Sie fand auch heraus, dass die NRC Schmiergelder von meinem Arbeitgeber angenommen hatte. All das kam in den Anhörungen vor dem Kongress ans Tageslicht. Danach kontaktierte ich die NRC neuerlich über meinen Anwalt. Es ging darum, dass mich der Direktor der Firma für eineinhalb Millionen Dollar verklagen wollte (wir hatten die Mitschriften, in denen er das zu Protokoll gab), er verklagte mich, weil ich an den Kongress geschrieben hatte. Der Grund, warum ich an den Kongress geschrieben hatte, war natürlich, dass die NRC korrupt war und ihre Untersuchung verpfuscht hatte: und die NRC tat – gar nichts. Sie sagten, es handle sich um eine Privatangelegenheit, sie könnten da nichts machen. Wenn Sie Ihren Prozess gewinnen, dann können wir uns vielleicht etwas einfallen lassen. Aber sechs oder sieben Jahre später, ohne jedes Einkommen, war das natürlich irrelevant. Das alte System hat also nicht funktioniert und es schaut so aus, als ob das neue System auch nicht funktioniert.

KH: Arnie, wenn du sagst: „Sechs oder sieben Jahre später war das natürlich irrelevant“, was meinst du damit?

AG: Nun, 1990 habe ich diese Dinge aufgedeckt, und wir sind schließlich 1996 einen Vergleich mit meinem Arbeitgeber eingegangen. In der Zwischenzeit hatte man uns in den Ruin getrieben: wir haben unser Haus verloren, unsere Pensionsansprüche, und ich würde niemals mehr in der Atomindustrie eine Anstellung finden. Es war ein vernichtender Ablauf. Offen gesagt, die außergerichtliche Einigung hat uns auch nicht für unsere Verluste entschädigt, schon gar nicht für die Zukunft abgesichert. Aber irgendwann muss man einfach mit seinem Leben weitermachen. Die ganze Angelegenheit hat den Verlauf meiner Karriere völlig verändert, und den Verlauf meines Lebens genauso. Das ist der Grund, warum wir jetzt Fairewinds betreiben. Letzten Endes ist die Arbeit für Fairewinds aber sehr befriedigend.

KH: Unglaublich. Dave, hattest du irgendwelche ähnlichen Erfahrungen?

DL: Nun, es war schlussendlich nicht ganz so dramatisch wie das, was Maggie und Arnie durchgemacht haben, aber als ich für die Atomindustrie gearbeitet habe, haben ein Kollege und ich auch in einer Sache Bedenken geäußert – und dann ging es in etwa in die von Arnie beschriebene Richtung. Wir haben also unsere Bedenken klar geäußert, aber die Firma wollte nichts unternehmen; daraufhin sind wir zur NRC gegangen. Wie Arnie auch, haben wir gedacht, diesem Kaliber wird nichts widerstehen können, aber was sie dann unternahmen, war ein Witz. Auch wir sind schließlich beim Kongress gelandet, so wie Arnie, um diesen „trickle down effect“ zu produzieren, bei dem der Kongress Druck auf die NRC ausübt, damit dort endlich was getan wird, um die Angelegenheit zu beheben. Das führte dann auch zu meinem Austritt aus der Atomindustrie, zu den besorgten Wissenschaftlern. Es ist, was einer meiner Kollegen „ethische Säuberungen“ nennt. Ethik und die Atomindustrie vertragen sich nicht. Der Stelle bei den besorgten Wissenschaftlern gibt mir die Möglichkeit, immer noch an Sicherheitsfragen zu arbeiten, ohne dass ich mir um den Gehaltszettel Sorgen machen muss.

AG: Ich denke, eine große Anzahl von Menschen sollte sehr dankbar für die Arbeit sein, die du bei den besorgten Wissenschaftlern leistest.

DL: Ich danke dir Arnie, ich glaube, genauso wie für eure Arbeit bei Fairewinds und die einer Reihe von weiteren Leuten, wie [?] und Jim Warren und anderen überall im Land. Einer der Vorteile dieses Jobs ist es, mit großartigen Kollegen im ganzen Land zusammenzuarbeiten. Ich bekomme jede Menge Anrufe: von Mitarbeitern in Kraftwerken und von Angehörigen der NRC, die wollen, dass ich das öffentliche Gesicht ihrer Bedenken bin, sodass die Angelegenheiten verfolgt werden können, ohne dass ihre Karriere gefährdet wird. Ich tue das sehr gerne, denn zu viele Menschen wurden schon auf dem Atomaltar geopfert – wir brauchen nicht noch mehr. Wenn ich also an einem Problem arbeiten kann und ihre Karrieren dabei schütze, dann ist mir das ein Vergnügen.

AG: Dave, wenn ich dich so höre, bekomme ich eine Gänsehaut.

DL: Ich gratuliere Fairewinds zu eurer Arbeit. Ich meine, man kann Youtube anklicken und fast zu jedem Thema ist Fairewinds Nummer vier oder fünf der obersten zehn Einträge bei jedem Thema; ich glaube, das ist ein beredtes Zeugnis für eure Arbeit; ich bin froh, wenn ich Teil davon sein kann.

AG: Ich danke dir, Dave!

KH: Na gut. Danke Dave, dass du heute mit uns diskutiert hast.

DL: Danke dir, Kevin!

KH: Und auch dir wie immer danke, Arnie!

AG: Danke dir, Kevin!

KH: Und so beenden wir diese Ausgabe unserer Sendung. Sie können uns am nächsten Sonntag wieder hören mit neuen Nachrichten aus der Welt der Atomkraft und besuchen Sie uns auf Facebook. Für Fairewinds Energy Education hörten Sie Kevin. Danke für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Quelle: Are Whistleblowers Being Protected By The NRC? Not Really!

http://www.fairewinds.org/images/content/are-whistleblowers-being-protected-nrc-not-really

Sprache des Podcasts: Englisch, 17. Februar 2013

Autoren: Fairewinds Energy Education http://www.fairewinds.org/images/

Übertragung nach der Originalquelle ins Deutsche: www.afaz.at (ak,lg,mv)

Dieses Schriftstück steht unter GFDL, siehe www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html . Vervielfältigung und Verbreitung - auch in geänderter

Form - sind jederzeit gestattet, Änderungen müssen mitgeteilt werden (email: afaz@gmx.at). www.afaz.at Februar 2013 / v4

KH:  This is the Energy Education podcast for Sunday, February 17, 2013.  I'm Kevin.  Today's discussion is all about nuclear whistleblowers and the process they are sometimes forced to use when they call attention to problems within the industry.  We will talk about the alternative dispute resolution process.  This is a process for nuclear industry workers who have been unfairly targeted or discriminated against to resolve their disputes.  Frequently, nuclear whistleblowers find themselves in exactly that situation.  Today we will be joined by David Lochbaum from the Union of Concerned Scientists to discuss the alternative dispute resolution process and hear some of his stories.

KH:  All right, today on the show I would like to welcome David Lochbaum.  David Lochbaum is with the Union of Concerned Scientists.  He is the Director of Safety Projects.  David, welcome to the show.

DL:  Hello, Kevin.

KH:  And of course, Arnie Gundersen, as always.  Welcome to the show.

AG:  Hi Kevin, hi Dave.

DL:  Hello Arnie.

KH:  Dave, I would like to start with you.  Today we are talking about whistleblowers and the ADR process.  Can you tell our listeners, what exactly is the ADR process?

DL:  The alternate dispute resolution or ADR process was instituted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission about 5 or 6 years ago.  It is a process where whistleblowers who have raised safety issues and have been retaliated or harassed by their management for doing so, can seek to get their situation remedied.  If they have been laid off, if they have been denied a promotion, if they have been otherwise harmed for raising a safety issue, the whistleblowers and their companies can enter into an ADR process that is moderated by people out of Cornell University to try to reach some settlement, some arrangement where the problems of the past have been fixed.

KH:  So David, how does that process work in reality?

DL:  Well in reality, the problem that the whistleblower fell into, whether it was loss of a job or losing overtime or some other harm for having raised a safety issue, at most it is getting fixed.  What happens when the NRC allows an ADR process to get started is that the NRC walks away.  They do not investigate the underlying technical issues.  If a settlement is reached, the company gets to do so scott free.  So the company could basically get rid of a hundred whistleblowers a year and it does not show up anywhere on the NRC's books as being a problem, even though there are federal laws being violated.  And also the NRC does not go in and look at the technical issues to see if they have been fixed or not.

KH:  So David, if a whistleblower or a nuclear worker goes to the NRC and then they are referred to the ADR process, how does that show up in the records?

DL:  It really does not show up at all.  It ends up being underneath the NRC's radar.  Prior to the ADR process, if the NRC substantiated that whistleblowers had been retaliated against, which violates federal laws, if the company had a pattern of that, more than one occurring, then the NRC would step in and issue a chilling effects letter that said, you have got a pattern of breaking federal laws here, what are you going to do to fix it and the perception amongst the workforce that they cannot raise safety issues.  Under ADR, all that is hidden from both the workforce, the public and the NRC.  The companies can basically do away with whistleblowers as a business decision, getting rid of them and the technical issues they raise.

KH:  So if a whistleblower does not feel that the ADR process is satisfactory, does it go back to the NRC?

DL:  That is correct.  It stays under the old process where the NRC will send out the Office of Investigations to look into the charges that the company violated federal laws.  If the Office of Investigations substantiates those claims, the NRC then can consider taking enforcement action against the company and also referring the case to the Department of Justice for possible criminal sanctions.  As an example of the ADR process, in 2007, a worker at the Calloway Nuclear Plant in Missouri raised an issue and was . . . irritated his employer and his employer took action against him for having raised that safety issue.  The employee went to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission because he felt that his employer had violated federal laws by retaliating against him.  The ADR process was invoked, the company, and this whistleblower reached an agreement, no action was taken against the company, the worker no longer works at the Calloway nuclear power plant, the underlying issue was never investigated by the NRC to see if the problems that the worker raised were ever fixed or not.

KH:  So this worker raised concerns over a technical issue, but what you are saying is since he reached a settlement in the ADR process, that that underlying technical issue was dropped and never actually investigated?

DL:  It would be like if somebody committed murder, if the murderer reached an agreement with the victims's family, bought them off, then they would drop the charges and the state or the feds would never look into it.  That is not the way to think.  You cannot kill somebody and get away with it, unless you are O.J.  Basically the companies can make a decision:  is it cheaper for me to fix the safety problem or pay off the whistleblower and send him out the door.  And that is not the way safety should be handled in America's nuclear power plants.

KH:  So of course the problem was never really addressed.

DL:  No.  It is papered over, swept under the rug, and that rug is getting awfully lumpy by now.  On average, the NRC handles about 5 to 10 of these cases a year.  So that is 5 or 10 nuclear safety problems not getting fixed each and every year.

AG:  The other piece of this is that if somebody is fired, they have no income.  So even if there is a legitimate safety concern and it sure would be nice if the NRC knew about it, they really have no choice but to settle because their income has completely dried up.

DL:  That is absolutely correct.  I mean the deck . . . it all favors the companies.  They hold the money.  They have the benefit of time.  And the NRC is aiding and abetting, they are breaking the laws.  It is a dire situation.  It is only getting worse.  For an agency that claims to be as transparent as it is, it is amazing how much they hide behind the curtain.

KH:  So what if we are talking about a worker who raises a safety concern?

DL:  But if you have just a safety concern with no harassment or intimidation involved, then that goes into the NRC's allegation process where they seek to go out and answer that question within a 180 days.  That is a somewhat tenuous schedule; we have had some that are almost 2 years old now, so apparently it is not 180 days in a row.  Last year, 2 NRC staffers, Richard Perkins and Larry Criscione, raised concerns about how the NRC was dealing with flooding issues at the county plant in South Carolina and 32 other nuclear power plants in the United States.  Perkins had authored a study of what the flooding hazard was and the NRC had improperly withheld that from the public, was Perkins' claim.  Perkins has gone to the NRC's Inspector General, which is investigating when the NRC withheld that information or not.  Criscione also reviewed that report, was involved with that report, raised some concerns.  He sent letters directly to Chairman McFarland and Senators Lieberman, before he left office, and Boxer.  The NRC responded by investigating Larry Criscione for leaking information outside the agency, rather than investigating whether it should have been withheld or not.  Basically, it is the attack the messenger, kill the messenger syndrome.

KH:  Now has Criscione filed within the agency for some sort of protection?

DL:  Larry Criscione yet has not suffered any retaliation or discrimination, so he has not yet filed any action to prevent it.  They are investigating him, "they" being the NRC's Inspector General, appears concerned that once the Inspector General finishes that investigation, that will be the grounds for terminating or dis-appointing him.  Larry has received a letter in his file warning him against distributing information outside the agency, even though we provided Larry and his attorney with countless cases where other NRC employees did the same or worse without any sanction whatsoever.  So he is being targeted unnecessarily and it is the NRC at it's absolute worst.  Larry Criscione should be in the White House receiving some award from the President, not worrying about his job.

KH:  Now did these 2 whistleblowers also go through the ADR process?

DL:  The NRC does not have an ADR process for people who raise safety issues like this.  In fact, when Larry Criscione sent the letter to Chairman McFarland, they were a little bit perplexed about how to handle it because the NRC does not have a written process for how to deal with that, how to handle __ with an issue that somebody has raised to the Chairman.  You would think in some 30 years that it might have come up once before, but apparently not.  So they are still trying to figure out how to handle or respond to Larry's letter dated September 19th, 2012.  They have not yet responded to his concerns.  If you look more broadly at the NRC, every 3 years, the Inspector General surveys the NRC workforce for safety culture and climate issues.  Last October, the latest survey was presented.  The Commission reviewed those results behind closed doors, which is safety culture 101:  if you cannot talk about it in public, you do not have a good safety culture.  The results, when we obtained them, showed that there is a big gap between how senior managers at the NRC view issues and the workforce (view) issues.  In fact, the consultant that does this survey said that the gap at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is wider than they have ever seen in federal agencies or in the private sector.  We take that to mean that if the NRC's senior managers do not see problems, they cannot fix problems they do not see.  They have, not rose colored glasses, they have green colored glasses; everything looks great to them.  So they do not fix problems in the house, they do not fix problems at a county, they do not fix fire protection problems at Brown's Ferry, they just collect their paychecks and retirement.

AG:  You know, in Maggie and my situation, that was back in 1990 before there was alternative dispute resolution, I found some safety problems and I did not go to the NRC, I went to the president of the company and you know it's a senior VP and I thought he would listen to me about these violations and instead he fired me.  I then went to the NRC and I really believed the NRC would come riding in like the calvary and rescue me.  And instead, the NRC started shooting at me too.  They botched the audit and they did not see any of the problems that I brought forward.  So finally I went to Congress and wrote to John Glenn and the Government Oversight Committee, and there were congressional hearings that John Glenn fired up because he had the Inspector General involved.  And the Inspector General found that all the safety concerns that I had identified and then a couple more actually did exist and that the NRC deliberately botched the inspection, basically because they did not want to chase all the paperwork required if they had found anything.  And he also found that the NRC was taking bribes from my employer.  So that all came out in congressional testimony.  After that, I wrote to the NRC again, through my attorney, and I said, you know Mr. Gundersen is being sued here for a million and a half dollars and we actually had the transcriptions from the president of the company and he said he is suing me because I wrote to Congress.  Well the reason I wrote to Congress is because the NRC was corrupt and blew the inspection.  And the NRC did not lift a finger.  Their comment was, well that is a civil matter and if he is being sued, we cannot do anything about it.  But if you win your lawsuit we will think about doing something.  And of course 6 or 7 years later with no income, that became a moot point.  So you know the old system did not work and now it seems as if the new system does not work either.

KH:  Arnie, when you say 6 or 7 years later it became a moot point, what do you mean?

AG:  Well, I blew the whistle in 1990 and we finally reached, a court settlement __ would be with my employer at the end of 1996.  Meanwhile, we were driven into bankruptcy, we lost our house in foreclosure, lost our retirement, obviously I was not going to get hired back in the nuclear industry again, so it was a devastating process and frankly the out of court process, the out of court settlement did not compensate us for what we had lost, let alone anything moving forward.  But you know you have to get on with your life at some point.  And it fundamentally altered the trajectory of my career and the trajectory of my life.  That is why we are running Fairewinds right now and I think at the end of the day, running Fairewinds has been rewarding.

KH:  Incredible.  Well, Dave, have you had any experiences similar to this?

DL:  It is not quite as drastic an outcome as what Arnie and Maggie went through.  But when I was working in the nuclear industry, a colleague and I raised an issue, a similar path to Arnie's, raised it initially to the company who did not want to do anything about it, took it to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, like Arnie, we thought it was like calling in the calvary, but instead, Laurel and Hardy showed up.  It was a joke.  We ended up going to Congress just like Arnie did, to get that trickle down effect where the Congress put some pressure on the NRC to finally do something to resolve the issue and that led to my departure from the industry as well and moved to UCS (Union of Concerned Scientists).  And what another colleague calls ethical cleansing, ethics and the industry do not mix very well.  So the UCS job provided me a chance to still work on safety issues and not have to worry about a paycheck.

AG:  I think a lot of people should be really grateful for the work you do at UCS, Dave, I will tell you that.

DL:  I appreciate that Arnie, and the work that you do in Fairewinds and many others, Ray Shadis, and Jim Warren and many around the country has been a pleasant part of this job is to work with so many great colleagues around the country.  I get an awful lot of calls from people, workers at plants and staffers at the NRC, who want me to be the public face on their concerns, so that the issue can be pursued without them jeopardizing their careers and I am glad to do that because too many people have been sacrificed on the nuclear alter and we do not need to do any more.  So, if I can work on an issue and protect their careers, I am glad to do so.

AG:  Dave, listening to you as always, gives me goosebumps.

DL:  My hat's off to Fairewinds for the work you are doing.  I mean if you would go to YouTube and put in almost any nuclear topic, Fairewinds comes out, you know, 4 or 5 of the top 10 slots on almost any issue and that is a testament to the work you guys are doing.  I am glad to be part of it.

AG:  Well thank you Dave.

KH:  All right.  Well, Dave, thanks for joining us today.

DL:  Thanks, Kevin.

KH:  And Arnie, as always.

AG:  Thanks, Kevin.

KH:  And that does it for this week's edition of the show.  You can join us back here next week for more discussion on what is happening in the world of nuclear news.  Also, don't forget to "Like" us on Facebook.  For Fairewinds Energy Education, I'm Kevin.  Thanks for listening.

[/tab][tab title="Deutsch"]

Whistleblower (im Deutschen keine Entsprechung verfügbar!): 

Wie Insider ständig gegen Vertuschungen ankämpfen, 

angefeindet von den Behörden, die sie eigentlich in Schutz nehmen sollten

KH: Dies ist der Energy Education Podcast vom Sonntag, dem 17. Februar 2013. Ich bin Kevin. Heute dreht sich unser Gespräch um Aufdecker innerhalb der Atomindustrie – und auch innerhalb der Aufsichtsbehörden; insbesondere wird es um den speziellen Ablauf gehen, der ihnen mitunter auferlegt wird, wenn sie Fehlverhalten in der Atomindustrie publik machen. Wir werden über den sog alternative dispute resolution process sprechen (also einen alternativen Konfliktbeilegungsmechanismus; ADR Prozess). Mitarbeitern der Atomindustrie, die von ihren eigenen Arbeitgebern verfolgt oder diskriminiert werden, soll dieser Mechanismus helfen, die Differenzen beizulegen. Häufig finden sich Arbeitnehmer der Atomindustrie, die auf Missstände aufmerksam gemacht haben, in genau dieser Lage wieder. Heute nimmt David Lochbaum von der Union of Concerned Scientists (Vereinigung besorgter Wissenschaftler) an unserem Gespräch über diesen Konfliktbeilegungsmechanismus teil; mit ihm werden wir einige der Fälle durchgehen.  Hallo also David Lochbaum, der in Sicherheitsangelegenheiten für die Vereinigung besorgter Wissenschaftler arbeite. David, willkommen zu unserer Sendung!

DL: Hallo Kevin!

KH: Und freilich ist auch Arnie Gundersen wieder dabei. Arnie, herzlich willkommen!

AG: Hallo Kevin! Hallo David!

DL: Hallo Arnie!

KH: Dave, ich möchte mit Ihnen beginnen. Heute soll es also um Aufdecker gehen und um den ADR Prozess. Können Sie unseren Zuhörern einmal erklären, was unter einem ADR Prozess zu verstehen ist?

DL: Dieser Mechanismus wurde von der Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USamerikanische Atomaufsichtsbehörde NRC) vor ungefähr fünf oder sechs Jahren eingerichtet. Es ist ein Mechanismus für Mitarbeiter, die Missstände aufgezeigt haben und dafür von ihren Arbeitgebern angegriffen und schikaniert werden: der Prozess soll ihnen die Möglichkeit geben, dieser Situation abzuhelfen. Wurden sie zum Beispiel entlassen oder bei einer Beförderung übergangen oder wurde ihnen in irgendeiner anderen Weise Schaden zugefügt, nur weil sie ihrer Sorge über sicherheitsrelevante Vorgänge Ausdruck verliehen haben, so können diese Individuen und ihre Firmen in einen ADR Prozess eintreten, der von Angehörigen der Universität von Cornell durchgeführt wird, um die Streitigkeiten beizulegen, um eine Übereinkunft zu erzielen, in der die Ausgangsprobleme einer Lösung zugeführt werden können.

KH: Nun David, wie läuft so ein Mechanismus dann konkret ab?

DL: Im realen Leben schaut es so aus, dass das Problem, mit dem der Aufdecker konfrontiert ist - ob er nun seinen Job verloren hat oder Überstundenzahlungen nicht ausbezahlt wurden oder er irgendeinen anderen Nachteil zu verbuchen hat, nur weil er auf Sicherheitsmängel hingewiesen hat –bestenfalls korrigiert wird. Sobald dieser ADR Prozess durch die NRC einmal angestoßen wurde, zieht sie sich zurück. Die zu Grunde liegenden technischen Sachverhalte werden nicht untersucht; wenn es zu einer Einigung kommt, ist die Betreiberfirma damit aus dem Schneider. Die Atomindustrie kann sich auf diese Art und Weise von hunderten Aufdeckern trennen, in den Aufzeichnungen der NRC tauchen diese Zahlen nirgends auf – obwohl Bundesgesetze übertreten wurden. Vor allem aber interessiert sich die NRC nicht für die technischen Details und ob diese korrigiert wurden oder nicht.

KH: David, wenn nun also so ein Aufdecker zur NRC geht und dann auf den ADR Prozess verwiesen wird, wie wird darüber Buch geführt?

DL: Eigentlich gar nicht, es es kommt gar nicht über die Aufmerksamkeitsschwelle der NRC. Vor der Einrichtung des ADR Prozesses stellte die NRC fest, ob gegen Aufdecker Maßnahmen ergriffen wurden, was gegen Bundesgesetze verstößt. Wenn sich bei einer Firma ein Muster ergab, also mehr als nur ein Einzelfall, dann schritt die NRC ein und verfasste einen speziellen Brief. In diesem stand in etwa: „Bei euch wird reihenweise Bundesgesetz übertreten: Was werdet ihr tun, um diesen Zustand in Ordnung zu bringen, sodass eure Mitarbeiter nicht das Gefühl haben müssen, sie dürfen sicherheitsrelevante Missstände nicht ansprechen?“ Beim ADR Prozess wird all das verborgen, vor den anderen Arbeitnehmern, der Öffentlichkeit und auch der NRC. Die Firmen können also Aufdecker im Rahmen einer rein wirtschaftlichen Entscheidung loswerden, sie selbst und auch die [Thematisierung der] technischen Sachverhalte, die von ihnen aufgezeigt wurden.

KH: Wenn einer dieser Aufdecker nun den Eindruck hat, dass der ADR Prozess keine zufriedenstellende Lösung darstellt, geht der Fall dann wieder an die NRC zurück?

DL Das ist richtig. Dann greift wieder der alte Ablauf, bei dem die NRC Untersuchungen anstellt, ob die betroffene Firma Bundesgesetze übertreten hat; wenn die Untersuchungsabteilung herausfindet, dass diese Anschuldigungen zutreffen, kann die NRC beschließen, die Einhaltung der Gesetze bei der Firma einzuklagen und den Fall an das Justizministerium weiterzugeben, um ein weiterführendes strafrechtliches Vorgehen abzuklären. Ein Beispiel für den ADR Mechanismus: im Jahr 2007 hat ein Mitarbeiter des Atomkraftwerks von Callaway, Missouri einen Missstand aufgezeigt und dadurch seinen Arbeitgeber so erbost, dass dieser Arbeitgeber Schritte gegen den Mitarbeiter einleitete, dafür, dass eine Sicherheitslücke aufgedeckt worden war. Der Arbeitnehmer wandte sich an die NRC, weil er der Ansicht war, dass sein Arbeitgeber, indem er Repressalien ergriffen hatte, gegen Bundesgesetze verstieß. Es wurde der ADR Prozess eingeleitet, die Firma und dieser Aufdecker kamen zu einer Übereinkunft, es wurde nichts gegen die beteiligte Firma unternommen. Der Betreffende arbeitet nicht länger im AKW von Callaway, der zugrunde liegende Sachverhalt wurde nie untersucht, die NRC hat nie nachgesehen, ob die Probleme, die dieser Mitarbeiter aufgezeigt hatte, jemals angegangen wurden.

KH: Dieser Mitarbeiter hat also seiner Besorgnis wegen einer technischen Gegebenheit Ausdruck verliehen, aber nun erfahren wir, dass als Resultat des ADR Prozesses, in dem es zu einer Einigung gekommen ist, diese technischen Sachverhalte nicht weiter verfolgt oder untersucht wurden.

DL: Es ist so, wie wenn jemand einen Mord begehen würde und der Mörder mit der Familie des Opfers zu einer Einigung käme, zB indem er sie ausgezahlt hätte, wofür sie jede Anklage fallen ließen, und weder auf Landes- noch auf Bundesebene würde sich jemand weiter darum kümmern. Das ist nicht … Es darf nicht sein, dass man jemanden umbringt und dafür nicht zur Rechenschaft gezogen wird – es sei denn, du bist OJ [Simpson; AmÜ]. Im Grunde können diese Firmen eine einfache Entscheidung treffen: Ist es billiger für mich, dieses Sicherheitsproblem zu beheben, oder zahle ich den Aufdecker einfach aus und entlasse ihn? Das ist aber nicht die Art, wie mit Sicherheitsbelangen in amerikanischen AKWs verfahren werden sollte.

KH: Das eigentliche Problem wurde also nie angerührt.

DL: Nein. Es wird zugekleistert, unter den Teppich gekehrt – der Teppich wird in der Zwischenzeit aber schon ganz schön uneben. Die NRC bearbeitet etwa fünf bis zehn dieser Fälle pro Jahr. Das bedeutet, dass jedes Jahr zwischen fünf und zehn Sicherheitsprobleme nicht beseitigt werden.

AG: Die andere Seite von all dem ist: wenn jemand gefeuert wird, so hat diese Person kein Einkommen. Also selbst, wenn es Sicherheitsbedenken gibt und sich so jemand denkt, dass es schon ganz gut wäre, wenn die NRC etwas unternähme, so gibt es keine andere Wahl, als eine Einigung anzustreben, denn sein Einkommen ist versiegt. Sie haben keine Mittel.

DL: Absolut richtig. Die Firmen haben alle Karten in der Hand. Sie haben das Geld, sie haben Zeit – und die NRC hilft ihnen dabei und unternimmt nichts, wenn sie gegen das Gesetz verstoßen. Es ist eine verhängnisvolle Situation und wird immer schlimmer. Bei einer Behörde, die vorgibt, besonders transparent zu sein, ist es schon erstaunlich, wie viel sie zu verbergen trachtet.

KH: Wenn wir zum Beispiel von einem Mitarbeiter sprechen, der in einer Angelegenheit Bedenken wegen der Sicherheit hat...

DL: Wenn es also nur um ein gerechtfertigtes Sicherheitsbedenken geht, ohne dass irgendeine Verfolgung oder Einschüchterung im Spiel ist, dann mündet das in einen Prozess der NRC für Behauptungen – dann soll innerhalb von 180 Tagen der Fall aufgegriffen und abgeklärt werden. Aber dieser Fahrplan ist mehr als unsicher: Wir haben Fälle, die nun schon älter als zwei Jahre sind – anscheinend sind nicht 180 aufeinander folgende Tage gemeint. Letztes Jahr haben zwei Angehörige des NRC, Richard Perkins und Larry Criscione, ihre Besorgnis darüber zum Ausdruck gebracht, wie die NRC mit Fragen zur Gefahr von Überflutungen beim AKW von Oconee in South Carolina und 32 anderen amerikanischen Bundesstaaten umgeht. Perkins gab einen Bericht zur Überflutungsgefahr heraus und die NRC hielt das – gegen die Regeln – vor der Öffentlichkeit geheim, so jedenfalls die Behauptung von Perkins. Perkins ging nun zur Innenrevision der NRC, der dafür zuständig ist, um herauszufinden, ob die NRC Informationen ungerechtfertigt zurückhält oder nicht. Criscione war an diesem Bericht ebenfalls beteiligt. Er schrieb Briefe direkt an die Chefin der Behörde, Allison Macfarlane, und an die Senatoren Lieberman (solange er noch im Amt war) und Boxer. Die NRC reagierte, indem sie eine Untersuchung gegen Larry Criscione einleitete, weil er Informationen nicht innerhalb der NRC gehalten hatte, anstatt zu untersuchen, ob diese Information überhaupt zurückgehalten werden hätte sollen.  Also. Kurz gesagt: Sie haben den Überbringer der Botschaft angegriffen. Der Überbringer schlechter Nachrichten wird geköpft.

KH: Hat nun Criscione innerhalb der Behörde um Absicherung angesucht?

DL: Larry Criscione wurde bislang noch nicht benachteiligt oder ähnliches, daher konnte er auch nicht darum ansuchen, dass dies verhindert wird. Er ist Ziel einer internen Untersuchung durch die Innenrevision und es gibt die Sorge, dass, wenn diese Untersuchung zu einem Ende kommt, Gründe gefunden sein werden, um ihn abzuschießen oder anderweitig zu enttäuschen. Larry hat einen Brief in seinem Dossier, der ihn davor warnt, Informationen an Personen außerhalb der NRC weiterzugeben, obwohl wir Larry und seinen Anwalt mit unzähligen Fällen versorgt haben, wo NRC-Angehörige das Gleiche oder Schlimmeres getan haben, ohne dafür irgendwie zur Rechenschaft gezogen zu werden. Er wird also grundlos zur Zielscheibe gemacht und das zeigt die NRC von ihrer absolut schlechtesten Seite. Larry Criscione sollte vom Präsidenten im Wei- ßen Haus irgendeine Auszeichnung bekommen, stattdessen muss er um seinen Job bangen.

KH: Sind diese zwei Aufdecker auch durch den ADR Prozess gegangen?

DL: Die NRC hat keinen ADR Prozess für Leute, die diese Art von Sicherheitsbedenken aufdecken. Als Larry Criscione diesen Brief an die Vorsitzende Macfarlane schickte, waren alle perplex, wie sie damit umgehen sollten, weil die NRC keinen festgelegten Ablauf hat, wie sie mit so einer Angelegenheit, die jemand an den Vorsitzenden heranträgt, umgehen soll. Man sollte meinen, dass so etwas im Laufe von 30 Jahren schon einmal passiert sein sollte, aber anscheinend ist das nicht der Fall. Die NRC ist also momentan damit beschäftigt herauszufinden, wie sie auf Larrys Brief vom 19. September 2012 reagieren sollen – bis jetzt sind sie noch gar nicht darauf eingegangen.  Wenn man sich das Thema etwas breiter anschaut: Alle drei Jahre befragt die Innenrevision die Mitarbeiter zu Belangen der Sicherheitskultur und des allgemeinen Klimas [Fragen, welche die Sicherheit betreffen, ansprechen zu können]. Im vergangenen Oktober wurde die letzte Umfrage präsentiert. Die Behörde bespricht die Resultate dieser Umfrage hinter verschlossenen Türen. Das ist nun die Grundstufe jeder Sicherheitskultur: wenn du in der Öffentlichkeit nicht darüber sprechen kannst, dann hast du keine gute Sicherheitskultur. Die Resultate, als wir sie dann beschaffen konnten, zeigen eine große Kluft in der Einschätzung von Sicherheitsangelegenheiten zwischen der obersten Führung und den restlichen Mitarbeitern. Der Konsulent, der diese Umfrage durchführte, sagte sogar aus, diese Kluft beim NRCsei grö- ßer als alles, was er in anderen Behörden oder im Privatbereich jemals gesehen habe. Für uns heißt das, dass die Führungsebene der NRC Manager unfähig ist, Probleme zu erkennen, und natürlich können sie Probleme, die sie nicht sehen, auch nicht beheben. Sie tragen keine rosaroten, sondern grün gefärbte Brillen: für sie schaut es so aus, als ob alles ganz ausgezeichnet läuft. Also bringen sie im eigenen Haus keine Probleme in Ordnung, sie tun das auch nicht in Oconee, es werden die Feuerschutzprobleme von Brown’s Ferry nicht angegangen, sie sammeln nur ihre Gehaltszettel und warten auf ihre Pensionierung.

AG: Und weißt du, die Situation für Maggie und mich war 1990 so – das war allerdings vor Einführung des ADR Prozesses: Ich habe einige Sicherheitsrisiken entdeckt, aber ich bin nicht zur NRC gegangen, ich bin zum Direktor der Firma gegangen, [fragte ihn, was man tun könne, um diese Verstöße zu beheben [? Schwer verständlich]. Stattdessen wurde ich gefeuert. Dann erst ging ich zum NRC – ich habe wirklich geglaubt, dass die NRC mir zu Hilfe kommen und mich retten würde. Stattdessen fing nun auch die NRC an, auf mich loszugehen. Sie haben ihre Überprüfung verpfuscht und keinen der Umstände, die ich aufgezeigte habe, anerkannt. Schlussendlich bin ich dann zum Kongress gegangen. Ich habe John Glenn und dem Government Oversight Committee geschrieben (gemeint ist das United States Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, AmÜ). Es gab auch Anhörungen im Kongress; John Glenn wurde ziemlich aktiv und involvierte die Innenrevision. Diese bestätigte, dass alle von mir benannten Sicherheitsrisiken (und darüber hinaus noch ein paar weitere) tatsächlich existierten und dass die NRC bewusst die Inspektion verschlampt hatte, im Grunde, weil sie sich all den Papierkram nicht antun wollten, der ansonsten fällig gewesen wäre. Sie fand auch heraus, dass die NRC Schmiergelder von meinem Arbeitgeber angenommen hatte. All das kam in den Anhörungen vor dem Kongress ans Tageslicht. Danach kontaktierte ich die NRC neuerlich über meinen Anwalt. Es ging darum, dass mich der Direktor der Firma für eineinhalb Millionen Dollar verklagen wollte (wir hatten die Mitschriften, in denen er das zu Protokoll gab), er verklagte mich, weil ich an den Kongress geschrieben hatte. Der Grund, warum ich an den Kongress geschrieben hatte, war natürlich, dass die NRC korrupt war und ihre Untersuchung verpfuscht hatte: und die NRC tat – gar nichts. Sie sagten, es handle sich um eine Privatangelegenheit, sie könnten da nichts machen. Wenn Sie Ihren Prozess gewinnen, dann können wir uns vielleicht etwas einfallen lassen. Aber sechs oder sieben Jahre später, ohne jedes Einkommen, war das natürlich irrelevant. Das alte System hat also nicht funktioniert und es schaut so aus, als ob das neue System auch nicht funktioniert.

KH: Arnie, wenn du sagst: „Sechs oder sieben Jahre später war das natürlich irrelevant“, was meinst du damit?

AG: Nun, 1990 habe ich diese Dinge aufgedeckt, und wir sind schließlich 1996 einen Vergleich mit meinem Arbeitgeber eingegangen. In der Zwischenzeit hatte man uns in den Ruin getrieben: wir haben unser Haus verloren, unsere Pensionsansprüche, und ich würde niemals mehr in der Atomindustrie eine Anstellung finden. Es war ein vernichtender Ablauf. Offen gesagt, die außergerichtliche Einigung hat uns auch nicht für unsere Verluste entschädigt, schon gar nicht für die Zukunft abgesichert. Aber irgendwann muss man einfach mit seinem Leben weitermachen. Die ganze Angelegenheit hat den Verlauf meiner Karriere völlig verändert, und den Verlauf meines Lebens genauso. Das ist der Grund, warum wir jetzt Fairewinds betreiben. Letzten Endes ist die Arbeit für Fairewinds aber sehr befriedigend.

KH: Unglaublich. Dave, hattest du irgendwelche ähnlichen Erfahrungen?

DL: Nun, es war schlussendlich nicht ganz so dramatisch wie das, was Maggie und Arnie durchgemacht haben, aber als ich für die Atomindustrie gearbeitet habe, haben ein Kollege und ich auch in einer Sache Bedenken geäußert – und dann ging es in etwa in die von Arnie beschriebene Richtung. Wir haben also unsere Bedenken klar geäußert, aber die Firma wollte nichts unternehmen; daraufhin sind wir zur NRC gegangen. Wie Arnie auch, haben wir gedacht, diesem Kaliber wird nichts widerstehen können, aber was sie dann unternahmen, war ein Witz. Auch wir sind schließlich beim Kongress gelandet, so wie Arnie, um diesen „trickle down effect“ zu produzieren, bei dem der Kongress Druck auf die NRC ausübt, damit dort endlich was getan wird, um die Angelegenheit zu beheben. Das führte dann auch zu meinem Austritt aus der Atomindustrie, zu den besorgten Wissenschaftlern. Es ist, was einer meiner Kollegen „ethische Säuberungen“ nennt. Ethik und die Atomindustrie vertragen sich nicht. Der Stelle bei den besorgten Wissenschaftlern gibt mir die Möglichkeit, immer noch an Sicherheitsfragen zu arbeiten, ohne dass ich mir um den Gehaltszettel Sorgen machen muss.

AG: Ich denke, eine große Anzahl von Menschen sollte sehr dankbar für die Arbeit sein, die du bei den besorgten Wissenschaftlern leistest.

DL: Ich danke dir Arnie, ich glaube, genauso wie für eure Arbeit bei Fairewinds und die einer Reihe von weiteren Leuten, wie [?] und Jim Warren und anderen überall im Land. Einer der Vorteile dieses Jobs ist es, mit großartigen Kollegen im ganzen Land zusammenzuarbeiten. Ich bekomme jede Menge Anrufe: von Mitarbeitern in Kraftwerken und von Angehörigen der NRC, die wollen, dass ich das öffentliche Gesicht ihrer Bedenken bin, sodass die Angelegenheiten verfolgt werden können, ohne dass ihre Karriere gefährdet wird. Ich tue das sehr gerne, denn zu viele Menschen wurden schon auf dem Atomaltar geopfert – wir brauchen nicht noch mehr. Wenn ich also an einem Problem arbeiten kann und ihre Karrieren dabei schütze, dann ist mir das ein Vergnügen.

AG: Dave, wenn ich dich so höre, bekomme ich eine Gänsehaut.

DL: Ich gratuliere Fairewinds zu eurer Arbeit. Ich meine, man kann Youtube anklicken und fast zu jedem Thema ist Fairewinds Nummer vier oder fünf der obersten zehn Einträge bei jedem Thema; ich glaube, das ist ein beredtes Zeugnis für eure Arbeit; ich bin froh, wenn ich Teil davon sein kann.

AG: Ich danke dir, Dave!

KH: Na gut. Danke Dave, dass du heute mit uns diskutiert hast.

DL: Danke dir, Kevin!

KH: Und auch dir wie immer danke, Arnie!

AG: Danke dir, Kevin!

KH: Und so beenden wir diese Ausgabe unserer Sendung. Sie können uns am nächsten Sonntag wieder hören mit neuen Nachrichten aus der Welt der Atomkraft und besuchen Sie uns auf Facebook. Für Fairewinds Energy Education hörten Sie Kevin. Danke für Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.


Quelle: Are Whistleblowers Being Protected By The NRC? Not Really!

http://www.fairewinds.org/images/content/are-whistleblowers-being-protected-nrc-not-really

Sprache des Podcasts: Englisch, 17. Februar 2013

Autoren: Fairewinds Energy Education http://www.fairewinds.org/images/

Übertragung nach der Originalquelle ins Deutsche: www.afaz.at (ak,lg,mv)

Dieses Schriftstück steht unter GFDL, siehe www.gnu.org/licenses/old-licenses/fdl-1.2.html . Vervielfältigung und Verbreitung - auch in geänderter

Form - sind jederzeit gestattet, Änderungen müssen mitgeteilt werden (email: afaz@gmx.at). www.afaz.at Februar 2013 / v4

[/tab][/tabgroup]