The Nuclear Sins of the Soviet Union Live on in Kazakhstan

The Nuclear Sins of the Soviet Union Live on in Kazakhstan

Much of what’s known about the health impacts of radiation comes from studies of acute exposure — for example, the atomic blasts that leveled Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Japan or the nuclear disaster at Chernobyl in Ukraine. Studies of those events provided grim lessons on the effects of high-level exposure, as well as the lingering impacts on the environment and people who were exposed. Such work, however, has found little evidence that the health effects are passed on across generations.

Read More

Flash from the past: Why an apparent Israeli nuclear test in 1979 matters today

Flash from the past: Why an apparent Israeli nuclear test in 1979 matters today

At a time when the Iran agreement is in the headlines and other Middle Eastern countries—notably Saudi Arabia—are making noises about establishing their own programs for nuclear energy and nuclear weapons, it is worth giving renewed scrutiny to an event that occurred 36 years ago: a likely Israeli-South African nuclear test over the ocean between the southern part of Africa and the Antarctic.

Read More

Dozens of nuclear blunders ‘ignored’

Dozens of nuclear blunders ‘ignored’

The nuclear safety regulator has been accused of turning a blind eye to dozens of serious mistakes at power plants and military bases.

A torpedo inadvertently fired by a Navy warship at the nuclear submarine dock in Plymouth and three road accidents involving vehicles carrying radioactive material were among the events dismissed as posing no danger.

Read More

FAS: Navy Builds Underground Nuclear Weapons Storage Facility; Seattle Busses Carry Warning

FAS: Navy Builds Underground Nuclear Weapons Storage Facility; Seattle Busses Carry Warning

The US Navy has quietly built a new $294 million underground nuclear weapons storage complex at the Strategic Weapons Facility Pacific (SWFPAC), a high-security base in Washington that stores and maintains the Trident II ballistic missiles and their nuclear warheads for the strategic submarine fleet operating in the Pacific Ocean. 

Read More

The New York Times: Decades Later, Sickness Among Airmen After a Hydrogen Bomb Accident

It was a late winter night in 1966 and a fully loaded B-52 bomber on a Cold War nuclear patrol had collided with a refueling jet high over the Spanish coast, freeing four hydrogen bombs that went tumbling toward a farming village called Palomares, a patchwork of small fields and tile-roofed white houses in an out-of-the-way corner of Spain’s rugged southern coast that had changed little since Roman times.

Read More

The New York Times: Veterans of Atomic Test Blasts: No Warning, and Late Amends

The New York Times: Veterans of Atomic Test Blasts: No Warning, and Late Amends

In combat, lives can be erased in an instant. Military men and women accept that as a given. But what if peril stalks them as civilians, long after the guns have fallen silent? As the years pass, does the nation bear an abiding obligation to them when they find they face death on the installment plan?

Read More